Career Coaching Blog

Executive Resume Articles

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How to Write a Career Transition Resume that Sells

In the gig economy which characterizes the modern job market, with opportunities flying left and right, more power of choice to the employee, and companies becoming increasingly agile, people have never switched jobs as quickly as they are now. This dynamic movement can, in turn, be a key driver of career progression by providing the experiences required to remain relevant in ever-changing industries and complex organizational contexts. The silos in which professions were once isolated are falli…

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Bullet proof ideas

Resume Bullet Points - How Bullet-Point Worthy is Your Job?

Bullet-Point Valuation

Your professional value is communicated through your conversations, word-of-mouth, your work, and through what you write on your resume, cover letter, LinkedIn profile and other branding materials. For your written branding materials, resume bullet points are the sound bites, the encapsulation of what you’ve done. In one to three lines per bullet, your professional contributions are described. It’s a moment of truth when it comes time to write-up your experience. The intent…

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Dumping the Resume Objective Statement

The question keeps coming up. “What should I write in my resume’s objective statement?”

We get this question from people at all levels. The fact that perfectly smart people don’t know what to do about this traditional section of the resume tells me that as an element of your marketing document (aka resume), it doesn’t work and is a waste of space.

If you have read this blog, I have ranted on more than one occasion about your resume’s purpose. It is, hands down, a marketing document, and should be…

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Career Boosting Tip #4: Do more than "dust off" the resume

Update your resume. Yes, I know, so obvious. But, I am suggesting more…

First, your resume should be relatively up-to-date. What does that mean? I recommend that anyone who has been in a job for more than 6 months should update their resume to include their current role. You never know who is going to call. Or what internal or external opportunities might come around. (Or, what negative surprise might you one Monday AM.)

More importantly, the process of capturing what you have done and what you …

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Truth Inspired Resume Writing

Translating your truth to your resume

Let’s explore the important theme of truth and how truth is related to an effective resume and cover letter. It sounds simple, but actually there are some not-so-obvious layers of meaning that you need to master.

What does the truth-theme have to do with your resumes and cover letters?

Your resume is an extension and representation of your professional self. Of course, you put your best foot forward when you craft your resume. But, in essence, your resume repre…

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How to Handle Contract Work on Your Resume

This is a common challenge. Contracting is extremely common in some industries, and not so much in others, so certainly part of the positive and negative reaction will be industry-based. However, there is a lot you can do to influence how the contracting experience is received.

The first thing is to make sure that it is crystal clear to the scanning eye that these were contracts. You don’t want the reader to think that you have been jumping around in your jobs. I will cover how below.

Second, you …

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Resume Writing: The Magic Formula for the Professional Experience Section

Okay, maybe it isn’t really magic. But it does make an unfocused resume really impressive.

The Problem

The average resume’s professional experience section isn’t very focused. Certainly, you want to write about the organization you worked for, what your role was and what you accomplished. The question is, when you do this, does the result really demonstrate what you can do? If you answered “no,” read on.

The Solution

It is actually very simple in concept. Where possible, describe the jobs you have h…

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Resume Writing: Transform Your Objective Statement

One area that most resumes could use some work on is the traditional objective statement at the top of the first page.

The most common problems are:

  • The objective isn’t specific and targeted enough to be appealing.

  • The objective is too soft and generic. Stating that you want a “challenging and rewarding job that will utilize your skills” will do nothing for your candidacy.

  • The objective is written as a statement of what you want vs. what you offer. Generally, employers aren’t as interested in what y…

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Preparing your resume for a promotion

How to edit your resume for the next level

When you are aiming for a promotion in your current field, the ideal resume is one that shows achievement in your current and past roles, a track record of successfully taking on increasing responsibilities, evidence of leadership at a level appropriate for the more senior role, involvement in areas that are directly related to the more senior role you are applying for, and through all of this, evidence of the appropriate skills.

Your resume needs to achi…

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Resumes: Handling In-Progress Education

You should absolutely include any relevant in-progress education or specialized training. The only time when you might not want to do it is when you have literally just started, or when the training itself is only a few days or weeks long and you have just started. You should wait in these instances.

Otherwise, truly “in-progress” education and training is a positive thing.

It is important to convey how much you have completed and/or how close you are to completing the requirements. Here are some …

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